Made-Up by Mirjam Plettinx

Discovered this lovely video whilst browsing Chicken Soup for the Dorky Soul:

I’ve been feeling homely lately and tried to scheme up ways to get prettier. Who is it really for? What would it accomplish? Who would love me if I were more beautiful, and who would I lose? Am I making a moral issue out of nothing?

How did this video make you feel?

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9 comments to Made-Up by Mirjam Plettinx

  • Oh no! It stopped at 2:48. I can’t see how it ends!

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    Rebekah Reply:

    Noooooooo!

    Try this: http://vimeo.com/12589228

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  • Oh dear me. That video made me feel sad.

    I’ve gone back and forth with how I feel about the various facets of grooming. I wasn’t all that interested in fashion until my body changed pretty radically after college and I found it a therapeutic way to adjust my shape. It also appeals to my creativity. But sometimes it gets mixed up with a shopping addiction, and sometimes I look into my packed closet and wonder at all the time I’ve spent thinking about my surface. I like the idea of looking put-together, as though it indicates that I’ve got it together in some crevice of my life, which feels pretty important when I’m adrift (hellooooo, quarter life). But the more time I spend on my appearance, the less relaxed I am; if I wear make-up, I worry it will smudge…if I style my hair, I worry about it falling out of place…I pull on my clothes because they don’t lay right (I know there are some things I can do to alleviate this but I have a difficult shape and can’t afford to tailor everything)…

    I wonder how much time I would save if I didn’t spend so much of it in front of the mirror. I don’t consider myself vain, but perhaps I’ve become so…hm. I used to be kind of tomboyish, and I remember that being a lot easier. But I can’t disagree with Sal and the other bloggers who promote self-care in grooming because there’s a lot tied up in the process, both inwardly and socially. But I haven’t found a good balance yet. How about you?

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  • Lori

    I like this video, slightly confused at the ending but maybe because it’s still too early and I was distracted. I think it’s sad that girls think that being beautiful is about looking like everyone else, when it reality its just bringing out the better parts of what you already have and embracing the not so good ones.
    I wonder what she was thinking at the end when she saw herself or what she used to be? I’m guessing it might be along the lines of “I didn’t look too bad to begin with, and at least then I was happy and comfortable in my own skin.”
    I love you just the way you are! You can get glammed up and look awesome, but you are (or at least appear to be) totally confident just being yourself. If you have enough confidence to shave your head, especially more than once, I can’t imagine you needing anything to make you “prettier” (that’s another train of thought…) and make you feel like you’re meeting the world’s standard of “pretty”.
    The Dove campaign for beauty – that’s what I’m leaning towards – those were awesome.

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  • Patricia

    It’s good to try to look good,(good does not mean like “magazine girls”) that is taking care of ourselves *loving who we are*, not abandoning our look is a sign of selfsteem, right?……BUT! there’s no need of getting obsessed about that. The video to me shows the fine line between wanting to look good in a healthy, simple way and making an obsession out if it. The cat walks out the door!! I mean, this obsession can create a distance with te ones we love, because we can get “too busy” looking at ourselves that forget the important things. To me natural beauty is soething that FLOWS from the inside (a true state of feeling well….in harmony and balance between body-mind-soul!), there’s no shampoo or facial cream that uses this as an ingredient!! The main ingredient for beauty is inside us, just have to find it!

    To conclude: from my point of view, balance is the key (as always).

    Hug! :)

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  • Stitchywitchy

    I remember Tom Hanks in an interview saying eventually he got to where he could just put on a hat and go out the door,
    not stand in front of the mirror forever asking himself “do I look cool in this hat?…does this hat make me handsome?…does it make me look older?…does it make me look like I’m trying to look younger…..?????” etc.
    He said it was Such A Relief to get to where he could just put the hat on, say to himself ‘yeah, this is how I look in this hat’ and just get on with the day and not think about his looks.
    I thought that sounded wonderful.

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  • Angela- It made me feel sad, too.

    I spend a lot of time Finding What Works; how to deal with my fluffy hair, how to get rid of this acne, figuring out which clothes suit my body. I don’t enjoy styling hair, wearing bold makeup, or following haute couture, so I don’t blow a lot of time or money there…

    My big problem is an identity crisis and worrying about what other people think; how much can I dress up and still feel like myself? If I wear ________, does it send an accurate message about my personality? What if everyone thinks I’m ______?

    I love reading style blogs, but they can lure me into feeling like the lady in the video— inadequate, uncool, behind the times, frumpy.

    Difficult shape, you say? My favorite blog about dressing different shapes is http://www.insideoutstyleblog.com/. A lot of it’s pretty standard, but her discussions on dressing different shapes are useful, as are her Choosing Color posts.

    I feel off-balance, too.

    Lori- Ah, but thinking of ourselves in terms of “good parts” and “not so good parts” can be dangerous if we let someone else define “good.”

    You sure do give a good pep talk! Thank you, Lori.

    Patricia- Another good pep talk!

    Balance is tricky! I do believe in self-care, and I love indulging in pretty things… but I need to spend more time working on my insides and developing new skills. I (and lots of other women) use clothes and primping as an excuse to avoid doing serious work.

    Stitchywitchy- Lovely! We should all be so self-assured. Tom Hanks IS a dude, though, so he has fewer people criticizing his every pore.

    [Reply]

    Patricia Reply:

    :) “I (and lots of other women) use clothes and primping as an excuse to avoid doing serious work.” that’s true, and I’m included too! Reading again….must say that it’s pretty obvious to say what I said before….I mean, of course it’s all abput balance….but who is in complete and quiet balance?! lol! I also wonder what my look says about me, and try to choose the outfit depending on what I want to say. Never get to know if the message arrives to others though! And everytime I change clothes again and again trying to look good (and only getting a messy room), the conclusion I get looking at the mirror is: the simpler the better! Life’s too complicated. Let’s have at least a clear simple look, so end up wearing jeans most of the time. The good thing is that the day I dare to wear a skirt I receive compliments on it, it’s not that I look better, just different and that catches attention from others. If I dressed up too much everyday It wolud be complicated to impress when I really need it :P

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    Rebekah Reply:

    Patricia

    “I also wonder what my look says about me, and try to choose the outfit depending on what I want to say. Never get to know if the message arrives to others though”

    I do that every day…

    “And every time I change clothes again and again trying to look good (and only getting a messy room), the conclusion I get looking at the mirror is: the simpler the better!”

    I know what you mean about the messy room! Every once in awhile I try on everything I own, just to see what still fits and what should be given away—- it’s always a mess.

    “it’s not that I look better, just different and that catches attention from others. If I dressed up too much everyday It would be complicated to impress when I really need it :P”

    Ha! An excellent point. Next time I want attention, I’ll try something DIFFERENT, for better or worse.

    [Reply]

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